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Shoes have been given to children in 70 countries worldwide, including the United States, Argentina, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Swaziland, Guatemala, Haiti and South Africa.[45] Toms are sold at more than 500 stores nationwide and internationally, including Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Whole Foods Market, which include shoes made from recycled materials.[46]

In June 2014, the company announced that Mycoskie was looking to sell part of his stake in the company to help it grow faster and meet its long-term goals.[23] On August 20, 2014 Bain Capital acquired 50% of Toms. Reuters reported that the transaction valued the company at $625 million; Mycoskie's personal wealth following the deal was reported at $300 million.[2] Mycoskie retained 50% ownership of Toms, as well as his role as "Chief Shoe Giver". Mycoskie said he would use half of the proceeds from the sale to start a new fund to support socially minded entrepreneurship, and Bain would match his investment and continue the company's one-for-one policy.[24][25]
A story by LA Weekly priced the manufacturing cost of a pair of Toms Shoes at $3.50-$5.00 in U.S. dollars, and noted that the children's shoes given out by the company were among the cheapest to make, which is not necessarily apparent to consumers. According to garment-industry author Kelsey Timmerman, many people he spoke to in Ethiopia were critical of the company, saying that they felt it exploited the idea of Ethiopian poverty as a marketing tool. An Argentina-based shoemaker agreed, saying that the imagery used by the company was manipulative.[47]
Departments Casual Boots Athletic Shoes Casual Shoes Sandals Rainwear Dress Shoes Winter Boots Bags & Wallets Moccasins & Mukluks Slippers Safety Shoes & Boots Dress Boots Clogs Accessories Shoe Care Popular Styles Sneakers Chelsea Boots Dress Oxfords Casual Oxfords Footbed Sandals Casual Loafers Moccasins Slipper Boat Shoes Walking Shoes Chukka Boots Safety Footwear Snow Boots Backpacks Collections New Arrivals! Night Out Ride The Wave Sneaker Goals Get Tough Footbeds Shop By Size
A story by LA Weekly priced the manufacturing cost of a pair of Toms Shoes at $3.50-$5.00 in U.S. dollars, and noted that the children's shoes given out by the company were among the cheapest to make, which is not necessarily apparent to consumers. According to garment-industry author Kelsey Timmerman, many people he spoke to in Ethiopia were critical of the company, saying that they felt it exploited the idea of Ethiopian poverty as a marketing tool. An Argentina-based shoemaker agreed, saying that the imagery used by the company was manipulative.[47]

On Monday night, we hosted an energizing and emotional rally in Washington, DC as we prepared to hand-deliver 700,000+ postcards to Congress the next morning. One of the most impactful moments of the evening was when Change the Ref created a live art piece using the words his son Joaquin sent to Congress 5 years before he was shot and killed in Parkland in 2018. We were also joined by @vicmensa, @cleowade, MILCK, and our dedicated partners, each using their own unique voice to put out the call to #endgunviolencetogether. Black and Brown Gun Violence Prevention Consortium @everytown Faith in Action Giffords Live Free @marchforourlives @momsdemand #YRK #naomiwadler @ Union Market DC
Departments Casual Boots Athletic Shoes Casual Shoes Sandals Rainwear Dress Shoes Winter Boots Bags & Wallets Moccasins & Mukluks Slippers Safety Shoes & Boots Dress Boots Clogs Accessories Shoe Care Popular Styles Sneakers Chelsea Boots Dress Oxfords Casual Oxfords Footbed Sandals Casual Loafers Moccasins Slipper Boat Shoes Walking Shoes Chukka Boots Safety Footwear Snow Boots Backpacks Collections New Arrivals! Night Out Ride The Wave Sneaker Goals Get Tough Footbeds Shop By Size
TOMS women's shoes are the perfect pick if you're looking for the right blend of comfort and style. From chic wedges and sandals to stylish sneakers, boots and slip-ons, our various styles offer whatever you need for special occasions, relaxing around the house and staying casual at work. TOMS for women come in large selection of solid colors, prints and patterns, as well as a range of fabrics like leather, canvas, twill, waterproof and more. With every pair of shoes you purchase, TOMS will give a new pair of shoes to a child in need. One for OneĀ®.
Employees of TOMS travel to different countries on "Giving Trips" to deliver shoes to children in person. In 2006, Toms distributed 10,000 pairs of shoes in Argentina.[48][49] In November 2007, the company distributed 50,000 pairs of shoes to children in South Africa.[50] As of April 2009, Toms had distributed 140,000 pairs of shoes to children in Argentina, Ethiopia, South Africa as well as children in the United States.[46] As of 2012, Toms has given away over one million pairs of shoes in 40 countries.[45][51]

In June 2014, the company announced that Mycoskie was looking to sell part of his stake in the company to help it grow faster and meet its long-term goals.[23] On August 20, 2014 Bain Capital acquired 50% of Toms. Reuters reported that the transaction valued the company at $625 million; Mycoskie's personal wealth following the deal was reported at $300 million.[2] Mycoskie retained 50% ownership of Toms, as well as his role as "Chief Shoe Giver". Mycoskie said he would use half of the proceeds from the sale to start a new fund to support socially minded entrepreneurship, and Bain would match his investment and continue the company's one-for-one policy.[24][25] 

Mycoskie sold his online driver education company for $500,000 to finance Toms shoes.[14] The company name is derived from the word "tomorrow",[9] and evolved from the original concept, "Shoes for Tomorrow Project".[16] Mycoskie initially commissioned Argentine shoe manufacturers to make 250 pairs of shoes. Sales officially began in May 2006.[14] After an article ran in the Los Angeles Times, the company received order requests for nine times the available stock online,[14] and 10,000 pairs were sold in the first year. The first batch of 10,000 free shoes were distributed in October 2006 to Argentine children.[7][17][18][19]
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